Edward Lorenz | Chaos Theory & Butterfly Effect

WASHINGTON (AP) — Edward Lorenz, the father of chaos theory, died at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Wednesday. He was 90.

He was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when he came up with the scientific concept that small effects lead to big changes, something that was explained in a simple example known as the “butterfly effect.” He explained how something as minuscule as a butterfly flapping its wings in Brazil changes the constantly moving atmosphere in ways that could later trigger tornadoes in Texas.

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5 thoughts on “Edward Lorenz | Chaos Theory & Butterfly Effect

  1. I believe in the butterfly effect to an extent. Every action has a reaction. Some come and go without being noticed others are more extreme and attention catching.

  2. A simple explanation made into a terrible movie. If this effect is real, and I believe to some extent it is, then imagine the havoc being caused by the existence of Ashton Kutcher.

  3. The butterfly effect has always intrigued me, particularly as a way of looking at the intricate connection between actions not only in the real world but in things like programs, designs, etc.

  4. Our abrupt existences all cause ripples that effect the world. I think people like Edward Lorenz leave behind ripples that will continue to effect the world for many years even after they have left the earth.

  5. I always thought it was interesting how some of the biggest ideas people have, come from studying nature. like studying weather and ending up with something philosophical.

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