Suupa Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

Jeremy Dawkins
Lecture: Thursday, February 19
RCVA #2008, 5:30 pm

jeremydawkins

Jeremy brings our clients’ brands to life – connecting them to audiences as simply and as powerfully as possible. He creates ideas that are innovative, useful, aesthetic, and consequent to the last detail. Jeremy has a deep understanding of the many facets of corporate and consumer branding: identity, environments, film and digital media, industrial design and consumer packaging.

As executive creative director of FutureBrand North America Jeremy’s role was to visually articulate clients’ business and brand strategy, their values and beliefs, through smart, provocative and sustainable design. Clients included Carrabba’s, Intel, Interna tional Rescue Committee, Microsoft, Sprite, and YBCA. Jeremy’s expertise in strategy and brand identity is built on 17 years of experience. Previously, he spent 10 years at Landor Associates as Creative Director of New York and Seattle. Clients there included Bath and Body Works, Delta Airlines, Diageo, Japan Airlines, Microsoft, Organized Living, Panasonic, Pepsi, and Proctor & Gamble. Before coming to the United States, Jeremy worked in Europe, for Landor, Michael Peters and Coley Porter Bell in London, and for BBDO in Belgium.

SUUPAA Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

A selection of examples of unique design, unexpected use of materials, innovative products, beautiful aesthetics and inspiring surprises.

For innovation and inspiration, all roads lead to Tokyo.There is no place where the delightful spirit and imagination of Japanese design is more apparent than in the corner supermarket—or “suupa”, as it is called locally. Here you’ll find the convergence of art and commerce across a dizzying array of categories and SKUs. It is an aesthetic that runs from the cool to the adorable to the ridiculous—often on the same shelf—and has long elicited curiosity as well as perplexed shrugs from the Western world. But while its intent may appear random or irrational to outsiders, Japanese packaging merely operates on its own unique design logic.

In Japanese packaging, we discover the modern expression of ancient philosophic principles—namely, the Confucian adherence to ritual and outward presentation. But the emphasis on outer appearances reflects contemporary economic realities as well. Real estate constraints, especially in Tokyo, yield fierce competition among brands to win floor space in convenience and grocery stores. With the high cost of manufacturing and distribution inflating product prices, there is significant pressure on packaging to not only attract attention, but communicate value, too.

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
February 19 – March 21, 2009

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