Amy Hauft Lecture – today 9/10

AmyHauft01
Photo credit: Jack Risley

September 10, 2009
Amy Hauft
Richmond Center for Visual Arts, room 2008
5:30 p.m.

Amy Hauft grew up in Southern California, earning her Bachelors in Art from the University of California Santa Cruz. From there, she attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture on scholarship, and subsequently earned her Masters of Fine Art at the Art Institute of Chicago. She then moved to New York City. Hauft has exhibited her large-scale architectural installations in museums and galleries world-wide including the Brooklyn Museum, the New Museum, the International Artists Museum (Poland), The American Academy in Rome, PS1 Museum, Wesleyan University Gallery, USC Atelier Gallery, School of the Art Institute of Chicago Galleryaaa, Sculpture Center, etc. She has been the recipient of numerous significant grants including the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship (twice), the St. Gaudens Foundation Fellowship, PEW Foundation Philadelphia Exhibition Initiatives, the Howard Foundation Fellowship and a Public Art Fund Grant. She has been awarded residencies that have allowed her to work in different parts of the world including the Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellowship in Umbria, Italy and the International Artists Residency Fellowship in Poland. Ms. Hauft taught for many years at the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, moving from Assistant to Full Professor. She taught for one year on the school’s Rome campus. She was recently selected to Chair the Sculpture Department at Virginia Comonwealth University.

Exhibition on View:
September 10 – October 09, 2009
Amy Hauft: Counter Re-Formation
Don Desmett, curator

Richmond Center for Visual Arts – Summer Exhibition

paulmarquardts09

Richmond Center for Visual Arts
Summer Exhibition to Focus on Frostic School of Art Alumni

Western Michigan University’s Richmond Center for Visual Arts will host two exhibitions by alumni in the Albertine Monroe-Brown Gallery. The exhibitions, Through a Crack in the Lake: Collaborative Paintings by Patricia Opel and Tim Norris, and Paul Marquardt: Word Play open on Thursday, April 23rd, and run through June 26, 2009.

From tribal shamanism to twentieth-century Surrealism, floating or swimming in water has been used as a symbol of sleep, hallucination, sex, birth, death, and passage to other spiritual realms. Submergence underwater as a metaphor for the subconscious or the dream-state is a common feature found in many artists’ works. For Patricia Opel and Tim Norris, this universal symbolism connects to local history in their collaborative paintings on the subject of Great Lakes shipwrecks and ecology. The show’s title is borrowed from sailor’s lingo describing the sudden and complete disappearance of a ship in a storm. But the title can also suggest a mythic descent into the subconscious.

Paul Marquardt’s works are a cross section of digitally altered images he has been working with over the past few years. But while technology has been used in their creation, Marquardt’s art is filled with content about who we are as humans and how we live on this earth. They are juxtapositions of our actions and our goals, politics and social norms, and the varied signals that stream between us as we live together in small communities, larger urban populations, or in our personal dream states. Word Play will expose layers of meaning, while giving us the means of seeing within ourselves – as well as others.

Annual Gwen Frostic School of Art Student Exhibition

Lecture: Thursday, March 26
RCVA #2008, 5:30 PM


Don Harvey

This year’s juror is the artist Don Harvey. Harvey has lived and worked in Cleveland Ohio for the last 25 years, where he has produced gallery works in various media, from industrial materials to digital images. He is also well known for his public art commissions and work with Cleveland’s Committee for Public Art agency, an organization he co-founded in the early 1980’s.

Harvey has had numerous one person and group exhibitions, including a recent exhibition at William Busta Gallery in Cleveland, and Don Harvey, Invented Landscapes at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. Group shows include Artists and the Art of the Book and One of a Kind Artists Books, both shows that traveled throughout the United States and South America. Harvey taught at the Meyers School of Art, the University of Akron from 1973-2000, and is now a Visiting Professor of Art at Oberlin College, in Ohio.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
April 2-16, 2009

Suupa Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

Jeremy Dawkins
Lecture: Thursday, February 19
RCVA #2008, 5:30 pm

jeremydawkins

Jeremy brings our clients’ brands to life – connecting them to audiences as simply and as powerfully as possible. He creates ideas that are innovative, useful, aesthetic, and consequent to the last detail. Jeremy has a deep understanding of the many facets of corporate and consumer branding: identity, environments, film and digital media, industrial design and consumer packaging.

As executive creative director of FutureBrand North America Jeremy’s role was to visually articulate clients’ business and brand strategy, their values and beliefs, through smart, provocative and sustainable design. Clients included Carrabba’s, Intel, Interna tional Rescue Committee, Microsoft, Sprite, and YBCA. Jeremy’s expertise in strategy and brand identity is built on 17 years of experience. Previously, he spent 10 years at Landor Associates as Creative Director of New York and Seattle. Clients there included Bath and Body Works, Delta Airlines, Diageo, Japan Airlines, Microsoft, Organized Living, Panasonic, Pepsi, and Proctor & Gamble. Before coming to the United States, Jeremy worked in Europe, for Landor, Michael Peters and Coley Porter Bell in London, and for BBDO in Belgium.

SUUPAA Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

A selection of examples of unique design, unexpected use of materials, innovative products, beautiful aesthetics and inspiring surprises.

For innovation and inspiration, all roads lead to Tokyo.There is no place where the delightful spirit and imagination of Japanese design is more apparent than in the corner supermarket—or “suupa”, as it is called locally. Here you’ll find the convergence of art and commerce across a dizzying array of categories and SKUs. It is an aesthetic that runs from the cool to the adorable to the ridiculous—often on the same shelf—and has long elicited curiosity as well as perplexed shrugs from the Western world. But while its intent may appear random or irrational to outsiders, Japanese packaging merely operates on its own unique design logic.

In Japanese packaging, we discover the modern expression of ancient philosophic principles—namely, the Confucian adherence to ritual and outward presentation. But the emphasis on outer appearances reflects contemporary economic realities as well. Real estate constraints, especially in Tokyo, yield fierce competition among brands to win floor space in convenience and grocery stores. With the high cost of manufacturing and distribution inflating product prices, there is significant pressure on packaging to not only attract attention, but communicate value, too.

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
February 19 – March 21, 2009

John Carson: Timelines 1975-2008

Lecture: Thursday, January 8, 2009
RCVA #2008, 5:30 pm


John Carson

John Carson joined Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh as Head of the School of Art in 2006. He was previously at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, where he was a principal lecturer in fine art and course director for the bachelor of fine arts program. He was also a lecturer in fine art and photography at the National College of Art & Design in Dublin and a visiting artist and lecturer at various schools and colleges in Britain, Ireland, Europe, the United States, Australia and New Zealand. Carson is an arts consultant for various organizations, including BBC-TV; Public Art Development Trust; Arts Council of England; London Arts; and others. He is an accomplished writer in the field of multimedia art, and his writing has appeared in various catalogues, magazines and books around the world. Carson is also a practicing multimedia artist. He received his bachelor of fine arts from the University of Ulster at Belfast in 1976 and his master’s degree in fine arts at the California Institute of the Arts in 1983.


John Carson
Timelines: 1975-2008
Sophie Thompson, (video detail)

During Carson’s final year at the College of Art and Design in Belfast, he worked on a number of projects that explored geographical and social aspects of the Belfast and Carrickfergus area, where he grew up. This project took Carson out of the art school building and into the streets, the countryside, and peoples’ homes. In Friend Map (1975-77) Carson visited everyone in the area who was a friend or relation, photographed them in their homes and placed the photographs on a map in the appropriate location.

Reflecting on his Friend Map project of 1975-76, Carson realized that none of the people who participated in that work had been given any voice in the work. Consequently he decided to revisit the project some 30 years later and began a series of video interviews with the people from the Friend Map who he had managed to track down again. Carson has asked each of them a set of questions to prompt them to reflect on their lives over the last 30 years and to consider how the reality of their lives today compares to any aspirations they might have had in 1976-77. Carson also hoped to discover how political events in Northern Ireland might have influenced their lives.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
January 8 – February 07, 2009

Annual Gwen Frostic School of Art Faculty Exhibition

The Frostic School of Art Faculty will showcase newest works produced from recent research and studio time. This exhibition helps students and community see the talent of those responsible for the education and support of over 450 students in the Frostic School of Art.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
December 4 opening
runs through December 20, 2008

Charismatic Abstraction


Moira Dryer
Fast Forward
Casein on canvas, 1991

Charismatic Abstraction: John L. Moore, Moira Dryer, Chris Martin, Dona Nelson, Mike Cloud

“Moira Dryer opened up something new in abstract painting and helped relocate something that had always been there. That something that no one else talks about because we lack a credible vocabulary to define: the vernacular soul. Moira brought soulfulness to painting. The balancing act between invention and examination is what energized Moira’s paintings.”
-Ross Bleckner

From an exhibition catalog Moira Dryer: Paintings 1989-1992 published by the Art Gallery of York University, Toronto.

Charismatic Abstraction focuses on five artists whose work is energizing, unpredictable, sometimes over the top in emotion, freshness, and even the age-old questions about the role of abstract painting and specific subject matter. Dona Nelson may use a paintings surface to span other works, by rubbing one surface to another, tracing, pushing, and repainting from sources that seem only moments old. John Moore can turn abstract patterns and circular orbs into landscape and figure. Moira Dryer extends the development of painting into space, with cuts in the surface, the addition of objects, and grand scale. Chris Martin’s James Brown painting actually captures visually the sounds and movements of the Great One. Mike Cloud can turn the symbols of everyday objects, clothing, and personal photographs, into distressingly disturbing patterns of meaning.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
October 30- November 25, 2008