Hans Richter


RHYTHMUS 21 – (1921)

Hans Richter
born 1888 Berlin, Germany
died 1976 Locarno, Switzerland

Johannes Siegfried Richter was born into a well-to-do Jewish family in Berlin. Although he wanted to be a painter, his father decided he should pursue architecture and thus Richter spent a year as a carpenter’s apprentice. Between 1908 and 1911 Richter studied art at the Academy of Art in Berlin, the Academy of Art in Weimar, and for a brief period at the Académie Julian in Paris.

By 1913 Richter had joined the mainstream of the expressionist circles of the avant-garde, meeting artists associated with Herwarth Walden’s Sturm Gallery in Berlin, and the radical expressionists who formed the Brücke in Dresden and the Blaue Reiter in Munich. In 1914 he became part of Die Aktion, an association of expressionist artists and writers gathered around Franz Pfemfert’s journal of the same name, who shared socialist and antiwar sympathies. In his graphic work for Die Aktion, which consisted of woodcuts, linocuts, and drawings, Richter began to make a decisive break with representational art. Though these works were often portraits of political or literary figures associated with the journal, their emphasis was on the stark impression made by juxtapositions of black and white shapes. The connection established in the context of Die Aktion between abstraction and engaged politics would be present throughout Richter’s life and work.


GHOSTS BEFORE BREAKFAST (1928)

When Richter was inducted into the army in September 1914, he and his friends, Ferdinand Hardekopf and Albert Ehrenstein, made a pact to meet again in two years at the Café de la terrasse in Zurich. A few months later, Richter was severely wounded while serving in a light artillery unit in Vilnius, Lithuania. Partially paralyzed, he was sent to recuperate at the Hoppegarten military hospital in Berlin, and in March Richter was officially removed from active duty. After his marriage in late August, Richter and his wife traveled to Switzerland to consult with physicians about his back injuries. There, on September 15, he stopped by the Café de la terrasse, where his two friends were waiting. They introduced him to members of the Dada group—Tristan Tzara, Marcel Janco, and Marcel’s brother Georges, who were sitting at a nearby table.

From 1917 to 1919 Richter was closely involved with Dada events, exhibitions, and publications, showing his paintings with the dadaists for the first time in January at the Galerie Corray. Throughout 1917 he also produced a series of paintings at a pace of three or four a day that he called “visionary portraits.” Depicting Dada friends but so abstract as to elude likeness, Richter deliberately painted these portraits at twilight in a trancelike state, in order to escape from the visible world. According to him, these pictures then “took shape before the inner rather than the outer eye,” transcending the particularity of the visible in order to attain a universal image. A series of woodcuts called “Dada heads,” also made during this period, continued Richter’s graphic exploration of abstract portraiture.


Dreams Money Can Buy (1947)

In the early spring of 1918 Tristan Tzara introduced Richter to Viking Eggeling, a Swedish painter who had developed a systematic theory of abstract art. Richter, who had been experimenting in his Dada heads with opposing black and white, positive and negative, found in Eggeling a friend and fellow theorist of abstraction. In 1920 they coauthored “Universelle Sprache” (Universal Language), a text defining abstract art as a language based on the polar relationships of elementary forms derived from the laws of human perception. For Richter, the central tenet of this text was that such an abstract language would be “beyond all national language frontiers.” He imagined in abstraction a new kind of communication that would be free from the kinds of nationalistic alliances that led to World War I.

Richter and Eggeling also produced an entirely new kind of artwork–the abstract film. Developed out of their theorizations of a universal language of forms, Rhythmus 21 and Rhythmus 23 introduced the element of time into the abstract work of art. Now classics of the cinema, the films show geometric shapes moving and interacting in space and set to a musical score. Richter’s 1927 film, Vormittagsspuk (Ghosts before Breakfast), which he developed from Dada ideas, shows everyday objects in rebellion against their owners: derby hats, potent symbols of bourgeois propriety and stability, take on lives of their own, parodying their inept masters.

In 1923 Richter began publishing G, a magazine that drew together the work of artists, architects, and writers associated with Dada, De Stijl, and international constructivism. His films were censored as early as 1927 when the object rebellion of Ghosts before Breakfast was understood as subversive of the social order. As a Jew, a modern artist, and a member of the political opposition, Richter was forced to leave Germany. He eventually emigrated to the United States, where he taught at the Film Institute of City College in New York. In 1962 he retired and returned to Switzerland.

https://www.nga.gov

Anders Weberg


Ambiancé – First short TRAILER – 7 Hours 20 Minutes in one take

Ambiancé – the short Trailer
Year: 2016
Duration: 7 hours 20 minutes in one take/no cuts.
Film: Anders Weberg
Performers: Niclas Hallberg and Stina Pehrsdotter
Main Character: Time
Music: Martin Juhls aka Marsen Jules

One beach
2 performance artists
7 hours and 20 minutes in One take, no cuts

On October 31 2015 the first short 7 hour and 20 minute trailer was filmed at Hovs Hallar in the south of Sweden. This is the same location Ingmar Bergman used for the iconic scene where Antonius Block challenges the grim reaper to a game of chess in the Seventh Seal from 1957.

The trailer was filmed in one single take for 7 hours and 20 minutes with no cuts and the Swedish performers Stina Pehrsdotter and Niclas Hallberg interpreted the chess game from the film as a Bergman-esque comment on the absurdity and randomness of existence in the scenes; life/quest/power /death/escape/rest/love.

The soundtrack is composed by Marsen Jules/Martin Juhls (marsenjules.de)’

Ambiancé is a 720 hour/30 day long film that is set to premiere on December 31 2020. This will be the artist Anders Weberg’s good bye to the moving medium as a way of expression for the last 25 years and no more films will be made after that. C’est fini.
The final film will be screened once syncronised on all the continents and then deleted. Ambiancé is 720 hours long (30 days) and will be shown in its full length on a single occasion syncronised in all the continents of the world and then destroyed.
Ambiancé will be the longest film made that doesn’t exist.

Up until 2020 three teasers/trailers will be publiced.
The first 72 minute teaser was released in 2014, the first short trailer in 2016 and then the longer 72 hour trailer will be released in 2018.

www.thelongestfilm.com


Absent VIII [2013] a homage to Maya Deren


Nothingness / Ten


Impressions [Belgrade]


Emptiness

Anders Weberg (b.1968)

Anders is an artist working in video, sound, new media and installations and he is primarily concerned with identity. The human body lies at the root of projects that formally and conceptually chart identity and its construction as a preamble to broaching matters of violence, genders, memory, loss or ideology in which personal experiences co-exists with references to popular culture, the media and consumerism. Specializing in digital technologies, he aims to mix genres and ways of expression to explore the potential of audio visual media. He coined the term Peer-to-peer art or (p2p art) in 2006. Art made for – and only available on – the peer to peer networks. The original artwork is first shared by the artist until one other user has downloaded it. After that the artwork will be available for as long as other users share it. The original file and all the material used to create it are deleted by the artist. ”There’s no original”. Six films with a duration between 45 minutes and 9 hours have been uploaded on the file sharing networks in one copy and their original have been deleted. P2P Art – The aesthetics of ephemerality.

Currently working on the longest film ever made. A 720 hours long video titled Ambiance that will premiere in 2020. Also the founder and curator of the Stian [con]temporary art gallery and AIVA, Angelholm International Video Art Festival 2012. Currently based in the small village Kölleröd in the south of Sweden and has exhibited at numerous art/film festivals, galleries, and museums internationally, including:

Oscar Niemeyer Museum, Curitiba, Brazil, 2012, Museum of Modern Art 2011, Buenos Aires, Argentina. File Brazil 2007-2008-2011- 2012, São Paulo, Brazil; FutureEverything 2010, Manchester, UK; National Museum of Contemporary Art 2010, Athens, Greece; Beijing Contemporary Art Centre 2010, Beijing, China; Cape 09 Art Biennale, 2009, Cape Town, South Africa; Biennale of Sydney 2008, Sydney, Australia; National Museum, Szczecin, Poland; [10th] Japan Media Arts Festival, Tokyo, Japan; 13th Barcelona International Festival of Advanced Music and Multimedia Art, SONAR, Barcelona, Spain; Scope New York, US; Museum of Contemporary Art (MAC), Santa Fe, Argentina; Pocket Films , Centre Pompidou, Paris; Videoformes, Clermont – Ferrand, France and EMAF, European Media Art Festival, Osnabrück, Germany.