Photography & Intermedia


Pi … faith in chaos by Adriane
November 16, 2016, 5:00 pm
Filed under: Experimental, Films, repost, Video Art

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Plot Synopsis: Max is a genius mathematician who’s built a supercomputer at home that provides something that can be understood as a key for understanding all existence. Representatives both from a Hasidic cabalistic sect and high-powered Wall Street firm hear of that secret and attempt to seduce him.

π was written and directed by Darren Aronofsky, and filmed on high-contrast black-and-white reversal film.

In 1996 Aronofsky began creating the concept for his first feature film “π”, a psychological sci-fi thriller. After the π script received great reactions from friends, he began production. The film re-teamed Aronofsky with Sean Gullette, who played the lead. During production, Aronofsky and crew realized they didn’t have enough money to complete the film. Associate Producer Scott Franklin came up with the idea to raise completion funds by asking every person they knew for $100. Later in production certain individuals put in more cash, which let Aronofsky complete the film. After π was completed (with a budget somewhere around $60,000), it premiered at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival and Aronofsky won the Directing Award. The film was picked up by distributor Artisan Entertainment and released in selected cities. The film later won an Independent Spirit Award and the Open Palm. $100 investors were said to be subsequently re-paid with $150. However, certain crew members complained that they were never paid at all. Crew members confronted Aronofsky about this, and he claimed he was suing his distributor. Use of the SnorriCam is one of Darren Aronofsky’s trademarks, as featured in π.

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American Beauty & the color Red by Adriane
October 26, 2016, 1:00 pm
Filed under: Films, ghost hunting, Intermedia

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Red has more personal associations than any other color. Recognized as a stimulant, red is inherently exciting and the amount of red is directly related to the level of energy perceived. Red draws attention and a keen use of red as an accent can immediately focus attention on a particular element.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red



Memento by Adriane
October 19, 2016, 5:00 pm
Filed under: Films, repost, Video Art

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Plot Synopsis: Leonard (Guy Pearce) is an insurance investigator whose memory has been damaged following a head injury he sustained after intervening on his wife’s murder. His quality of life has been severely hampered after this event, and he can now only live a comprehendable life by tattooing notes on himself and taking pictures of things with a Polaroid camera. The movie is told in forward flashes of events that are to come that compensate for his unreliable memory, during which he has liaisons with various complex characters. Leonard badly wants revenge for his wife’s murder, but, as numerous characters explain, there may be little point if he won’t remember it in order to provide closure for him. The movie veers between these future occurrences and a telephone conversation Leonard is having in his motel room in which he compares his current state to that of a client whose claim he once dealt with.



Rage by Adriane
October 10, 2016, 2:00 pm
Filed under: Films, repost

Michelangelo, an unseen schoolboy armed only with a cell phone camera, goes behind the scenes at a New York fashion show during seven days in which an accident on the catwalk turns into a murder investigation, and his interviews with key players become a bitterly funny expose of an industry in crisis.

Fourteen actors, both celebrated stars and exciting emerging talents, play characters who each have a role in the fashion show: from the designer (Simon Abkarian) and his models (supermodel Lily Cole and Jude Law, stunning in drag), the toxic fashion critic (Academy Award winner Judi Dench) the desperate war photographer turned paparazzo (Steve Buscemi), the fashion house financier (Eddie Izzard) and his bodyguard (John Leguizamo). As they confide in Michelangelo, personal secrets are revealed and the reality of events taking place off screen begins to unravel.

RAGE is the new cinematic creation from Sally Potter, director of the Oscar-nominated ORLANDO. Defying the usual conventions of film, RAGE focuses entirely on the individual performances of its world-class cast.



The Final Cut, 2004 by Adriane
September 28, 2016, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Films, ghost hunting, repost

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Plot Synopsis: The story is set in a world where implanted microchips can record all moments of an individual’s life. The chips are removed upon death so the images can be edited into something of a highlight reel for loved ones who want to remember the deceased. Caviezel portrays the leader of the organization that opposes this technology’s development.

The Final Cut is a film written and directed by Omar Naim, released in 2004. The cast includes Robin Williams, James Caviezel, Mira Sorvino and Genevieve Buechner. It was produced by the Canadian production company, Lions Gate Films. The film featured original music by Brian Tyler. The story takes place in an alternate reality in which every moment of people’s lives are recorded by “Zoe Implants”, so that they may be viewed by loved ones after one’s death. The plot centers on Alan Hakman (Williams), a cutter, whose job it is to edit the Zoe footage into a feature-film length piece, called a “Rememory”.

The Final Cut is about subjectivity, memory and history; posing the question, “If history is what is written and remembered, then what happens when memories are edited and rewritten?” The movie also brings up the problem of infringement of privacy, and can be seen as mirroring the loss of privacy in today’s society. The film won the award for best screenplay at the Deauville Film Festival and was nominated for best film at the Catalonian International Film Festival and Berlin International Film Festival.



Jacob’s Ladder by Adriane
September 7, 2016, 2:00 pm
Filed under: Films, ghost hunting, Intermedia

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After returning home from the Vietnam War, veteran Jacob Singer (Tim Robbins) struggles to maintain his sanity. Plagued by hallucinations and flashbacks, Singer rapidly falls apart as the world and people around him morph and twist into disturbing images. His girlfriend, Jezzie (Elizabeth Peña), and ex-wife, Sarah (Patricia Kalember), try to help, but to little avail. Even Singer’s chiropractor friend, Louis (Danny Aiello), fails to reach him as he descends into madness.

Release date: November 2, 1990 (USA)
Director: Adrian Lyne
Budget: 25 million USD
Screenplay: Bruce Joel Rubin
Music composed by: Maurice Jarre



Run Lola Run by Adriane
February 3, 2016, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Films, repost

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Run Lola Run (original German title Lola rennt, translates as Lola Runs) is a 1998 film by German screenwriter and director Tom Tykwer, starring Franka Potente as Lola.

In the movie “Run Lola Run” (Lola rennt in German-1998), the butterfly effect is represented more clearly. There, minor and almost sub-conscious actions in everyday life can be seen to have gross and wide spread effects upon the future. For example, the fact that Lola bumps into someone instead of passing by may lead to a painful death after suffering paralysis. As such, seemingly inconsequential actions can be seen to have drastic long-term results.

Lola’s boyfriend Manni is trying to prove his loyalty to a gang boss. Manni’s final task in a particular job is to deliver 100,000 Deutsche Marks to his boss Ronnie. Everything goes wrong. Lola’s moped is stolen and she is unable to transport Manni to the meeting place. After waiting for her Manni decides to use the metro. He accidentally leaves the bag, with its 100,000 Marks, in the underground after an encounter with a bum and two ticket-controllers. The money is then found by the homeless man. Manni realises what he’s done and soon makes a desperate phone call to Lola, asking her to think of something, to help him. If he does not have the money by the meeting at 12 noon, he will certainly be killed. Lola promises to get him the 100,000 marks. Manni warns her that he will rob a supermarket on the street corner if Lola has not come in 20 minutes. Can Lola get him the money and save his life? It is at this point that the three sequential alternative realities begin.

The film features several allusions to Alfred Hitchcock’s film Vertigo. Like that film, it features recurring images of spirals, such as the ‘Spirale’ Cafe behind Manni’s phone box and the spiral staircase down which Lola runs. In addition, the painting on the back wall of the casino of a woman’s head seen from behind is based on a shot in Vertigo: Tykwer disliked the empty space on the wall behind the roulette table and commissioned production designer Alexander Manasse to paint a picture of Kim Novak as she appeared in Vertigo. Manasse could not remember what she looked like in the film and so decided to paint the famous shot of the back of her head. The painting took fifteen minutes to complete.

There are also several references to German culture in the film. The most notable is the use of Hans Paetsch as a narrator. Paetsch is a famous voice of children’s stories in Germany, recognized by millions. Many of the small parts are cameo roles by famous German actors (for example the bank teller). Also, two quotes by German football legend Sepp Herberger appear: “The ball is round, the game lasts 90 minutes, everything else is pure theory,” and, “After the game is before the game.” (wikipedia)

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The meaning of the butterfly
Why pop culture loves the ‘butterfly effect,’ and gets it totally wrong
By Peter Dizikes
June 8, 2008

SOME SCIENTISTS SEE their work make headlines. But MIT meteorologist Edward Lorenz watched his work become a catch phrase. Lorenz, who died in April, created one of the most beguiling and evocative notions ever to leap from the lab into popular culture: the “butterfly effect,” the concept that small events can have large, widespread consequences. The name stems from Lorenz’s suggestion that a massive storm might have its roots in the faraway flapping of a tiny butterfly’s wings.

article here