Pipilotti Rist

Meet the sensuous Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist, whose work full of colour and playfulness. She here argues that videos can have painterly qualities and tells the story of one of her most famous videos, where a woman smashes car windows with a flower.

“There is no rule for when and where I get my ideas – some are survival tactics, some are psychotic tics, some are very well thought over.” The video ‘Ever is Over All’ (1997) was Rist’s response to a chief editor, who wouldn’t let her do the things she wished to do – even though he had given her a carte blanche. She felt like smashing his car, but instead chose to make a video, which challenged and even altered her aggression: “That was my catharsis.”

“I’m not more colourful than life is.” The screen is like “a moving glass painting” to Rist, who enjoys the playful use of colours. Moreover, she feels that a lot of people distance themselves from colour, even finding it intimidating. Rist, however, wants to fight for colour: “They call it superficial, but actually it’s dangerous.”

Elisabeth Charlotte “Pipilotti” Rist (b. 1962) is a Swiss visual artist, who works with video, film and moving images, which are often displayed as projections. She takes her name from Pippi Longstockings, heroine of Swedish author Astrid Lindgren’s much-loved series of children’s books. Early on in her career she began making super 8 films, which generally last only a few minutes and contain alterations in their colours, speed and sound. Among the themes her work centres on are gender, sexuality and the human body. In 1996 her work was first featured in the Venice Biennial, where she was awarded the ‘Premio 2000 Prize’. Other awards include the ‘Wolfgang Hahn Prize’ (1999), the ‘Joan Miró Prize’ (2009) and the ‘Cutting the Edge Award’ at the 27th Annual Miami International Film Festival (2010). Rist’s works are a part of prominent museums worldwide such as MoMA in New York City and Tate Modern in London.

For more about Pipilotti Rist see: http://pipilottirist.net/

Pipilotti Rist was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Hayward Gallery in London, November 2011.

Gravity Be My Friend

Pixel Forest

Mercy Garden



Susan Hiller

Channels, 2013

A cascade of voices belonging to people who have been declared physically dead, but lived to tell the story, comes together in a ghostlike installation of 104 screens. Experience the intriguing art installation by the influential American artist Susan Hiller.

‘Channels’, the installation artwork Hiller discusses, centres on death and near-death experiences. The 104 television screens, which the artwork consists of, are programmed with visuals in shades of blue – echoing the “screen of death” in computer terms and the “stand-by screen” in TV-terms – and a myriad of voices belonging to people who have had near-death experiences. The result is fascinating and somewhat uncanny.

Hiller is interested in investigating certain occurrences, such as near-death experiences, which have become subject to ridicule and even embarrassment: “The point is that the stories are there, and it’s worth looking into them.” The incidents furthermore seem to contradict the common belief that the brain is a source of consciousness or reality.

Susan Hiller (b. 1940) is an American London-based artist. In the early 1980s she began to make innovative use of audio and visual technology. Her groundbreaking installations, multi-screen videos and audio works have achieved international recognition and are widely acknowledged as a major influence on younger British artists. Hiller’s works are based on specific cultural artefacts from our society, which she uses as basic materials. With a practice extending over 40 years, she has been recognized by mid-career survey exhibitions at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts (1986), Tate Liverpool (1996) and Tate Britain (2011). For more about Susan Hiller see: http://www.susanhiller.org/

Susan Hiller was interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in connection with her exhibition ‘Channels’ at Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art in Copenhagen, February 2015.

Camera: Kasper Kiertzner
Produced and edited by: Kasper Bech Dyg
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2015

Wild Talents, 1997


Julie Mehretu • The In-Between Place

Louisiana Channel

Julie MehretuThe In-Between Place

Interview with the American artist Julie Mehretu about how her perspective is the result of a ”very important shift” in her life which occurred when her family moved to the US from Ethiopia. Mehretu fuses forms in order to create an ‘in-between place’.

In this interview New York based Ethiopian born artist Julie Mehretu (b.1970) talks about how she uses abstract art to create a psychological space for herself. Mehretu explains how her perspective and interest is informed by this ”very important shift” which occurred when her family moved to the US right after the Ethiopian revolution. Her paintings are in some ways an attempt at making sense of herself as situated in a kind of in-between psychological space: ”There’s this type of spacial shift that has occurred, and there’s a connection, a kind of psychological space, making sense of a place.”

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Julie Mehretu explains that she likes working with abstraction because it is ”an in-between place”. New forms are created through the intermingling of space and drawing, social and political elements and controlled moments combined with the intuitive. The paintings have many levels of reading, feeling, engaging, and they have no beginning nor end, Mehretu says: ”You can see through everything.”

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Julie Mehretu is known for her densely-layered abstract paintings and prints. Her paintings are built up through layers of acrylic paint on canvas, overlaid with mark-making using pencil, pen, ink and thick streams of paint. Her canvases overlay different architectural features.

Julie Mehretu was interviewed by Jesper Bundgaard at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York 2013.

Camera and editing: Per Henriksen
Produced by Louisiana Channel
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013.
Supported by Nordea-fonden.