Photography & Intermedia


Dan Lander by Adriane
February 14, 2017, 12:30 pm
Filed under: Sound Art, Video Art


Dan Lander – Talking to a Loudspeaker

Dan Lander studied art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax (Nova Scotia) with a focus on performance, video and sound. After leaving school he set up a modest recording studio in his apartment and developed a method of composition which sprang from his interest in phonography and the referential in recorded sound. This interest also led to his involvement as an editor of two anthologies: Sound by Artists (1990) and Radio Rethink: Art, Sound and Transmission (194). He was the producer of the radio art program The Problem with Language (CKLN, Toronto) from 1987 to 1991. His works for radio and loudspeaker are dependent on sound recordings gathered from real life situations, organized with an ear to the ways in which meaning circulates through the invisible conduit of sounding and hearing. His works have been widely aired in North America and Europe.


Dan Lander – Composition


Dan Lander – Decomposition



John Cage by Adriane
February 1, 2017, 12:30 pm
Filed under: Intermedia, repost, Sound Art

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“It was at Harvard not quite forty years ago that I went into an anechoic [totally silent] chamber not expecting in that silent room to hear two sounds: one high, my nervous system in operation, one low, my blood in circulation. The reason I did not expect to hear those two sounds was that they were set into vibration without any intention on my part. That experience gave my life direction, the exploration of nonintention. No one else was doing that. I would do it for us. I did not know immediately what I was doing, nor, after all these years, have I found out much. I compose music. Yes, but how? I gave up making choices. In their place I put the asking of questions. The answers come from the mechanism, not the wisdom of the I Ching, the most ancient of all books: tossing three coins six times yielding numbers between 1 and 64.”
–John Cage, 1990

UBUWEB:SOUND


John Cage “4’33”


John Cage “4’33”



Benoit Maubrey by Adriane
June 11, 2015, 2:00 pm
Filed under: repost, Sound Art


Image Credits: © Benoit Maubrey

Benoît Maubrey is the director and founder of DIE AUDIO GRUPPE a Berlin-based art group that build and perform with electronic clothes. Basically these are electro-acoustic clothes and dresses (equipped with amplifiers and loudspeakers) that make sounds by interacting thematically and acoustically with their environment.

In his non-mobile sculptural work he frequently uses former public (disguarded) monuments and recycles them using modern technology and electronics. Recycled and “found” electronics as his artistic medium. Since 1982 he has been conceiving and creating interactive sculptures in public spaces. In most cases the sculptures interact with their environment: quite often they function as “Speakers Corner” where the public can express themselves “live”.

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Speaker-Sculptures-Benoit-Maubrey-11

Artist’s Statement:
PHONIC BODIES and CHOREOGRAPHED SOUNDS
Performances with electroacoustic clothes

My decision in the early 1980s to stop working with pigments and canvas came from a desire to interact directly with public spaces. By building loudspeakers into clothes I could intervene in any given environment in a temporary and cost-efficient way: loudspeakers and circuit boards are cheap and can be salvaged from surplus electronics and disguarded toys. My artistic tools are electroacoustic clothes: costumes and suits that are equipped with loudspeakers and amplifying systems that allow the individual wearers to react acoustically to their environment. Basically each person wears one part of a composition: the position of the individual “audio actors” and their movement (their “orchestration”) within a space produces the final composition. At the same time I develop this concept thematically by adapting the “clothes” to particular sites, cultures and regions. In all of this work I use electronics as a modern “clay” that I can form and create into fantasy-full performances and objects.

http://www.benoitmaubrey.com



LUIGI RUSSOLO by Adriane
September 22, 2014, 12:00 pm
Filed under: repost, Sound Art

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Luigi Russolo with his assistant Ugo Piatti and their Intonarumori (noise machines)

The Art of Noise
by Luigi Russolo February 22, 2004

 

Luigi Russolo (1885 – 1947), Italian futurist painter and musician and inventor of the “intonarumori” expounded his musical theories in 1913 in this manifesto entitled “L’arte dei rumori” (The Art of Noises) in which he presented his ideas about the use of noises in music.

Dear Balilla Pratella, great Futurist composer,

In Rome, in the Costanzi Theatre, packed to capacity, while I was listening to the orchestral performance of your overwhelming FUTURIST MUSIC, with my Futurist friends, Marinetti, Boccioni, Carrà, Balla, Soffici, Papini and Cavacchioli, a new art came into my mind which only you can create, the Art of Noises, the logical consequence of your marvelous innovations.

Ancient life was all silence. In the nineteenth century, with the invention of the machine, Noise was born. Today, Noise triumphs and reigns supreme over the sensibility of men. For many centuries life went by in silence, or at most in muted tones. The strongest noises which interrupted this silence were not intense or prolonged or varied. If we overlook such exceptional movements as earthquakes, hurricanes, storms, avalanches and waterfalls, nature is silent.

Amidst this dearth of noises, the first sounds that man drew from a pieced reed or streched string were regarded with amazement as new and marvelous things. Primitive races attributed sound to the gods; it was considered sacred and reserved for priests, who used it to enrich the mystery of their rites. And so was born the concept of sound as a thing in itself, distinct and independent of life, and the result was music, a fantastic world superimposed on the real one, an inviolatable and sacred world. It is easy to understand how such a concept of music resulted inevitable in the hindering of its progress by comparison with the other arts. The Greeks themselves, with their musical theories calculated mathematically by Pythagoras and according to which only a few consonant intervals could be used, limited the field of music considerably, rendering harmony, of which they were unaware, impossible.
More on Theremin Vox



The Visual Microphone: Passive Recovery of Sound from Video by Adriane
August 20, 2014, 9:33 am
Filed under: Sound Art



Bartholomäus Traubeck • years by Adriane
May 3, 2014, 4:06 pm
Filed under: Intermedia, Sound Art

A record player that plays slices of wood.
Modified record player, wood, sleeves. 2011



Jarbas Agnelli • Birds on the Wires by Adriane
March 17, 2014, 11:58 am
Filed under: Sound Art


If you do not understand the spoken language go to 3:29