Stephen Vitiello


From composing electronic music to scoring experimental videos to making larger-scale public installations that create immersive soundscapes, sound artist Stephen Vitiello invites his audience to reinterpret sound. He took us on a sonic tour of his work including recordings from a 1999 residency at the World Trade Center and his sound installation at New York City’s High Line, “A Bell for Every Minute.”


Sound Artist, Stephen Vitiello, encourages you to “close your eyes to watch this talk.” A talk of sound, he explains that your eyes process images more slowly than your ears process sound. Close your eyes and listen well.

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. It was filmed and edited by Tijo Media at the Carpenter Theatre at Dominion Arts Center in Richmond, VA.

#sound #listen #VCUarts #kineticimaging

Electronic musician Stephen Vitiello’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Lyon. His exhibitions include a site-specific work for New York City’s High Line and the 2006 Biennial of Sydney. Vitiello has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for Fine Arts, Creative Capital funding for Emerging Fields, and an Alpert/Ucross Award for Music. In 2012, Australian Television produced the documentary, “Stephen Vitiello: Listening With Intent.” Originally from New York, Vitiello is now based in Richmond, VA where he is a professor of Kinetic Imaging at Virginia Commonwealth University.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Stephen Vitiello (b. 1964, New York City)
Solo exhibitions include All Those Vanished Engines, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (2011-(ongoing)); A Bell For Every Minute, The High Line, NYC (2010-2011); More Songs About Buildings and Bells, Museum 52, New York (2011); and Stephen Vitiello, The Project, New York (2006). He has participated in such group exhibitions as Soundings: A Contemporary Score, Museum of Modern Art, NY (2013); Sound Objects: Leah Beeferman and Stephen Vitiello, Fridman Gallery, New York (2014); September 11, PS 1/MoMA, LIC, NY (2011-2012); the 15th Biennale of Sydney, Australia (2006); Yanomami: Spirit of the Forest at the Cartier Foundation, Paris; and the 2002 Biennial Exhibition, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2002). Vitiello has performed nationally and internationally, at locations such as the Tate Modern, London; the San Francisco Electronic Music Festival; The Kitchen, New York; and the Cartier Foundation, Paris. In 2011, ABC-TV, Australia produced the documentary Stephen Vitiello: Listening With Intent. Awards include Creative Capital (2006) and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2011-2012). Vitiello is a professor of Kinetic Imaging at Virginia Commonwealth University. He lives and works in Richmond, Virginia.

“Electronic musician and sound artist Stephen Vitiello transforms incidental atmospheric noises into mesmerizing soundscapes that alter our perception of the surrounding environment. He has composed music for independent films, experimental video projects and art installations, collaborating with such artists as Nam June Paik, Tony Oursler and Dara Birnbaum. In 1999 he was awarded a studio for six months on the 91st floor of the World Trade Center’s Tower One, where he recorded the cracking noises of the building swaying under the stress of the winds after Hurricane Floyd. As an installation artist, he is particularly interested in the physical aspect of sound and its potential to define the form and atmosphere of a spatial environment.”

Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain catalog for the exhibition
Ce qui arrive/Unknown Quantity, 2002

http://www.stephenvitiello.com

Robyn O’Neil

Directed by Eoghan Kidney
Based on Artwork by Robyn O’Neil
Written by Eoghan Kidney & Robyn O’Neil
Produced by Nicola Gogan @ Still Films
Animated by Eoghan Kidney, Ciaran Crowley and Mark Flood

“We, The Masses” is an award-winning, animated short film based on the artwork of the Nebraska-born O’Neil, who calls herself a “maker of worlds.” Her wry, sincere humor infuses her well-known apocalyptic and anxiety-ridden drawings―10 years of which forms the basis of the film. After attending Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School where she met Irish director Eoghan Kidney, the two teamed up to bring O’Neil’s drawings to life in this 13-minute, stop motion animation. Supported by a grant from the Irish Film Board, “We, The Masses” is presented at the CWAM courtesy of the artist and the Susan Inglett Gallery in New York City.

Using her familiar archetype for humanity―sweatsuit-wearing men encountering opposition in nature or self-destructing in Bosch-like tableaus―”We, The Masses” explores futility, hope, and self-inflicted wounds as it swings from the foibles of humanity to the epic effects of weather and the natural world. Prescient yet eerily relevant, it tackles both public alienation and the unconscious anxiety of our social and political era.

O’Neil studied British art and architecture at Kings College, received a bachelor’s degree in fine art from Texas A&M University-Commerce, and did her graduate work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Major solo exhibitions include those at the Des Moines Art Center and the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston. She has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including the Hunting Prize and a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and her recently published book, “Robyn O’Neil: 20 Years of Drawing,” is available through Archon Projects.

https://www.wooster.edu

Camille Norment

Triplight, 2008
Light sculpture
1955 Shure microphone, light, electronic components
Dimensions variable
Edition of 2

As a cultural icon, the 1955 Shure Microphone can be said to symbolize ‘the golden years’. In this work, the microphone housing contains a bright piercing light that casts a large shadow reminiscent of a metal mask or ribcage onto the wall. Periodically at random intervals, the light flickers like a bulb casting its last rays of light; it is the silent noise of social realities and the suppressed voice.
The glowing light and skeletal shadow cast by Triplight tell parallel stories of its time and mirror our own, beautifully revealing contradictions in the silent stutter of its unstable light.
The word ‘triplight’ refers to a trigger that sets off a state of alarm. It also refers to “trip the light fantastic”, a historical reference to a type of dance, and more recently a state of hallucination.

http://www.norment.net/work/objects-installations-ind/triplight