Photography & Intermedia


FLUXUS by Adriane
February 1, 2016, 9:30 am
Filed under: Intermedia, repost, Video Art

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fluxus

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Anders Weberg by Adriane
November 29, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: repost, Video Art


Absent VIII [2013] a homage to Maya Deren


Nothingness / Ten


Impressions [Belgrade]


Emptiness

Anders Weberg (b.1968)

Anders is an artist working in video, sound, new media and installations and he is primarily concerned with identity. The human body lies at the root of projects that formally and conceptually chart identity and its construction as a preamble to broaching matters of violence, genders, memory, loss or ideology in which personal experiences co-exists with references to popular culture, the media and consumerism. Specializing in digital technologies, he aims to mix genres and ways of expression to explore the potential of audio visual media. He coined the term Peer-to-peer art or (p2p art) in 2006. Art made for – and only available on – the peer to peer networks. The original artwork is first shared by the artist until one other user has downloaded it. After that the artwork will be available for as long as other users share it. The original file and all the material used to create it are deleted by the artist. ”There’s no original”. Six films with a duration between 45 minutes and 9 hours have been uploaded on the file sharing networks in one copy and their original have been deleted. P2P Art – The aesthetics of ephemerality.

Currently working on the longest film ever made. A 720 hours long video titled Ambiance that will premiere in 2020. Also the founder and curator of the Stian [con]temporary art gallery and AIVA, Angelholm International Video Art Festival 2012. Currently based in the small village Kölleröd in the south of Sweden and has exhibited at numerous art/film festivals, galleries, and museums internationally, including:

Oscar Niemeyer Museum, Curitiba, Brazil, 2012, Museum of Modern Art 2011, Buenos Aires, Argentina. File Brazil 2007-2008-2011- 2012, São Paulo, Brazil; FutureEverything 2010, Manchester, UK; National Museum of Contemporary Art 2010, Athens, Greece; Beijing Contemporary Art Centre 2010, Beijing, China; Cape 09 Art Biennale, 2009, Cape Town, South Africa; Biennale of Sydney 2008, Sydney, Australia; National Museum, Szczecin, Poland; [10th] Japan Media Arts Festival, Tokyo, Japan; 13th Barcelona International Festival of Advanced Music and Multimedia Art, SONAR, Barcelona, Spain; Scope New York, US; Museum of Contemporary Art (MAC), Santa Fe, Argentina; Pocket Films , Centre Pompidou, Paris; Videoformes, Clermont – Ferrand, France and EMAF, European Media Art Festival, Osnabrück, Germany.



Kelly Richardson by Adriane
November 28, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: Installation, repost, Video Art


Pipilotti Rist by Adriane
November 27, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: repost, Video Art

Louisiana Channel – Pipilotti Rist



Douglas Gordon • The End of Civilisation, 2012 by Adriane
November 26, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: repost, Video Art



Bill Viola: Cameras are soul keepers by Adriane
November 25, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: Identity & Image, repost, Video Art


Bill Viola and the making of Emergence

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A Fire in My Belly • David Wojnarowicz by Adriane
November 24, 2015, 9:30 am
Filed under: repost, Video Art

watch video here

OFFICIAL STATEMENT

P.P.O.W and The Estate of David Wojnarowicz disagree with the Smithsonian’s decision to withdraw the artist’s 1987 film piece “A Fire in My Belly” from the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition entitled “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture.” P.P.O.W has represented Wojnarowicz’s work since 1988 and maintained a close working relationship with the artist until his death in 1992. The gallery now represents his estate.

On behalf of the estate, the gallery would like to offer the artist’s words to illuminate his original intentions. In a 1989 interview Wojnarowicz spoke about the role of animals as symbolic imagery in his work, stating, “Animals allow us to view certain things that we wouldn’t allow ourselves to see in regard to human activity. In the Mexican photographs with the coins and the clock and the gun and the Christ figure and all that, I used the ants as a metaphor for society because the social structure of the ant world is parallel to ours.”

The call for the removal of “A Fire in My Belly” by Catholic League president William Donahue is based on his misinterpretation that this work was “hate speech pure and simple.” This statement insults the legacy of Wojnarowicz, who dedicated his life to activism and the arts community. David Wojnarowicz’s work is collected by international museums including the Museum of Modern Art, NY, The Whitney Museum, The Library of Congress, The New York Public Library, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Reina Sofia in Madrid, Museum Ludwig in Cologne, the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, etc. Wojnarowicz is also an established writer; his most well known memoirs are Close to the Knives and Memories That Smell Like Gasoline, which are included on many university syllabi.

In 1990 the artist won a historic Supreme Court case, David Wojnarowicz v. American Family Association. The courts sided with Wojnarowicz after he filed suit against Donald Wildmon and the American Family Association, who copied, distorted and disseminated the artist’s images in a pamphlet to speak out against the NEA’s funding of exhibits that included art works of Wojnarowicz and other artists. We are deeply troubled that the remarks, which led to the removal of David’s work from Hide/Seek, so closely resemble those of the past. Wojnarowicz’s fight for freedom of artistic expression, once supported by the highest court, is now challenged again. In his absence, we know that his community, his supporters, and the many who believe in his work will carry his convictions forward.

P.P.O.W Gallery




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