Community invited to Haenicke memorial service

dietherhaenicke

KALAMAZOO–Western Michigan University classes will be canceled from 1:45 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26, to allow the campus community to participate in a celebration of the life of President Emeritus Diether H. Haenicke, which has been scheduled for 2:30 p.m. that day in WMU’s Miller Auditorium.

Classes will be held as scheduled from 8 a.m. until 1:45 p.m. Classes that begin at 5 p.m. or later will be held as scheduled. In addition, many parts of the campus will close during that period, as supervisors are asked to offer employees an opportunity to attend the Haenicke service as University operations permit. While most offices will be closed during the period, operations will continue in University Libraries, food services, computing centers, public safety and other essential service areas as defined by individual University vice presidents.

“Students and their welfare were at the very core of Diether H. Haenicke’s life and career,” notes WMU President John M. Dunn. “No celebration of his presidency would be complete without the opportunity for students to attend. We also wish to honor the longtime relationship Dr. Haenicke had with colleagues on campus by giving those whose lives he touched an opportunity to honor his memory.”

Students who have questions about the closing and how it will affect them should check with their instructors.

The memorial event at Miller Auditorium will be immediately followed with a reception in the Richmond Center for Visual Arts. Additional details about the event and information on live broadcasts will be available closer to Feb. 26.

Future of Food

futurefood.jpg

Description
There is a revolution happening in the farm fields and on the dinner tables of America, a revolution that is transforming the very nature of the food we eat. This documentary explores the disturbing truth behind the unlabeled, patented, genetically engineered foods that have quietly filled grocery store shelves for the past decade. It also examines the complex web of market and political forces that are changing what we eat as huge multi-national corporations seek to control the world’s food system. “One of 2005’s must-see documentaries” -San Francisco Chronicle.

Last Call … Thesis Exhibits for Fall 2009

Last chance to apply for a BFA Graduation exhibition in the DeVries Student Gallery for the Fall semester of 2009. The gallery needs all names by Friday, February 27. We will be doing a Lottery for dates the week after Spring Break, and will be announcing the entire Fall 09 Schedule by March 27.

See the Exhibitions office for contract information. All exhibitions will need a signed contract by the faculty committee sponsor to be eligible to exhibit.

do this ASAP.

Suupa Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

Jeremy Dawkins
Lecture: Thursday, February 19
RCVA #2008, 5:30 pm

jeremydawkins

Jeremy brings our clients’ brands to life – connecting them to audiences as simply and as powerfully as possible. He creates ideas that are innovative, useful, aesthetic, and consequent to the last detail. Jeremy has a deep understanding of the many facets of corporate and consumer branding: identity, environments, film and digital media, industrial design and consumer packaging.

As executive creative director of FutureBrand North America Jeremy’s role was to visually articulate clients’ business and brand strategy, their values and beliefs, through smart, provocative and sustainable design. Clients included Carrabba’s, Intel, Interna tional Rescue Committee, Microsoft, Sprite, and YBCA. Jeremy’s expertise in strategy and brand identity is built on 17 years of experience. Previously, he spent 10 years at Landor Associates as Creative Director of New York and Seattle. Clients there included Bath and Body Works, Delta Airlines, Diageo, Japan Airlines, Microsoft, Organized Living, Panasonic, Pepsi, and Proctor & Gamble. Before coming to the United States, Jeremy worked in Europe, for Landor, Michael Peters and Coley Porter Bell in London, and for BBDO in Belgium.

SUUPAA Pop: Contemporary Japanese Package Design

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

A selection of examples of unique design, unexpected use of materials, innovative products, beautiful aesthetics and inspiring surprises.

For innovation and inspiration, all roads lead to Tokyo.There is no place where the delightful spirit and imagination of Japanese design is more apparent than in the corner supermarket—or “suupa”, as it is called locally. Here you’ll find the convergence of art and commerce across a dizzying array of categories and SKUs. It is an aesthetic that runs from the cool to the adorable to the ridiculous—often on the same shelf—and has long elicited curiosity as well as perplexed shrugs from the Western world. But while its intent may appear random or irrational to outsiders, Japanese packaging merely operates on its own unique design logic.

In Japanese packaging, we discover the modern expression of ancient philosophic principles—namely, the Confucian adherence to ritual and outward presentation. But the emphasis on outer appearances reflects contemporary economic realities as well. Real estate constraints, especially in Tokyo, yield fierce competition among brands to win floor space in convenience and grocery stores. With the high cost of manufacturing and distribution inflating product prices, there is significant pressure on packaging to not only attract attention, but communicate value, too.

This exhibition was organized by AIGA, the professional association for design.
AIGA, the professional association for design, is the oldest and largest membership association for design professionals engaged in the discipline, practice and culture of designing. Its mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

AIGA was founded as the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1914. Since then, it has become the preeminent professional association for communication designers, broadly defined. In the past decade, designers have increasingly been involved in creating value for clients (whether public of business) through applying design thinking to complex problems, even when the outcomes may be more strategic, multidimensional and conceptual than what most would consider traditional communication design.

Albertine Monroe Brown Gallery
February 19 – March 21, 2009

Our Daily Bread

dailybread

Product Description
Welcome to the world of industrial food production and high-tech farming. To the rhythm of conveyor belts and immense machines, the film looks without commenting in the places where food is produced: monumental spaces, surreal landscapes and bizarre sounds a cool, industrial environment which leaves little space for individualism. People, animals, crops and machines play a supporting role in the logistics of this system which provides our society s standard of living. OUR DAILY BREAD is a wide-screen tableau of a feast which isn’t always easy to digest and in which we all take part. A pure, meticulous and high-end film experience that enables the audience to form their own ideas.

About the Director
Nikolaus Geyrhalter is an Austrian filmmaker born in Vienna in 1972. He has directed seven films since 1994, OUR DAILY BREAD (2005) is his fifth film. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the prestigious Joris Ivens Jury Award at Amsterdam International Documentary Festival and his work has been selected at the renowned Venice and Cannes film festivals among others.

soundwaves: the art of sampling


Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego
Stephanie Hanor, Senior Curator

Sound has played a significant role in the development of modern contemporary art, from the visual references of Wassily Kandinsky and Piet Mondrian in the early twentieth-century to the aural experimentations of Nam June Paik and John Cage in the 1950’s and 1960’s. SOUNDWAVES: The Art of Sampling looks at a specifically late twentieth-century manifestation of the conjunction of art and sound and features artists who appropriate the musical process of sampling in their work, either through the incorporation of found sound or through visual and material references. In the past ten years, MCASD has recognized the growing prominence of this artistic interest and has been a forerunner in collecting and commissioning works that are influenced by the DJ techniques of sampling and mixing, combining and recontextualizing diverse snippets of music, film, pop culture, and history to create new connotations and experiences.

read more, view artwork and hear audio from the artists here